Persian Rugs

Oriental rugs are carpets hand knotted only in Asia. The countries that are the biggest exporters of rugs include, Iran, China, India, Russia, Turkey, Pakistan, Tibet and Nepal. Persian rugs also are Oriental rugs but they are made only in Iran (formerly known as Persia). The art of carpet weaving in Iran originated more than 2,500 years ago. Much of the progression of the Persian carpet lies in conjunction with the various rulers of the country throughout time. When Cyrus the Great conquered Babylon in 539 BC, he was struck by its splendour and many historians credit him for introducing the art of carpet making into Persia. It is said that the tomb of Cyrus, who was buried at Pasargadae near Persepolis, was covered with precious carpets. Even before his time, it is very likely that Persian nomads created at least very simple designs for their own homes. Their herds of sheep and goats provided them with high quality and durable wool for this purpose. Persian carpets and rugs were initially woven as articles of necessity to cover the floors of nomadic tribesmen, giving them protection from the cold and damp. The natural progression of the skill and craft involved in the creation of these works of art has been passed down from generation to generation over the centuries throughout periods of peace, invasion and war.

 

Characteristics of a Persian rug include an unusually thick pile, extremely rich color combinations and unique designs, and a very distinct knot. Persian carpets are traditionally known for their tremendous variety in design, color, size, and weave. Moreover, they are known for the uniqueness of each and every rug produced. Today, carpet weaving is by far the most widespread handicraft in Iran. Because the rug artists in Iran are so skilled at their craft, they can create incredibly detailed rugs with impressive precision. Rugs are generally named after the village, town or district where they are woven or collected, or by the weaving tribe in the case of nomadic pieces.The importance of trade and craftsmanship regained their spot in the last quarter of the 19th Century during the reign of Qajar. By the end of the 19th Century some European and American companies even set up businesses in Persia and organized craft production destined for western markets, creating new design. In palaces, famous buildings, mansions and museums the world over, a Persian carpet is amongst the most treasured of possessions.

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